Monthly Archives: November 2010

Finding objects

Any small object that is accidentally dropped will hide under a larger object.

Anonymous


Unlimited power

All I want is a warm bed and a kind word and unlimited power

Ashleigh Brilliant


Assembling

After an instrument has been assembled, extra components will be found on the bench.

Anonymous


Developing apps on iOS, a free Course

The guys at Open culture gave the link for 20 free lectures from Stanford University on how to develop applications on iOS (full article at http://www.openculture.com/2010/11/developing_apps_for_iphone_ipad_a_free_stanford_course.html), direct ItunesU link at http://ax.itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=395631522.


Avoiding flu getting in your house

Francesca Clarke at DIY life (http://www.diylife.com/bloggers/francesca-clarke/) teaches some ways to secure your house against flu.

Among them (in bold my comments):

  • Keep a Clean Mop (that’s right)
  • Stock the Bathroom (I also keep a little stock of “tiger balm”  or other canphora products to help breathing better)
  • Check Your Cleaning Products (That’s the real point, though quite difficult to handle, especially if having children aged 2-4)
  • Sanitize Your Sponges (True)
  • Choose Copper
  • Clean Your Desk (another good point)
  • Sanitize your phone and remote control (too much for me)
  • Handle Your Laundry With Care
  • Humidify Your Home (another good point)
  • Preach About Washing Your Hands

(full article at http://www.diylife.com/2010/11/25/flu-symptoms-proof-your-home).

This post as a comment also at http://www.diylife.com/2010/11/25/flu-symptoms-proof-your-home


Successful tools

A successful [software] tool is one that was used to do something undreamed of by its author.

S. C. Johnson


Why batteries die

John Herrman at Gizmodo (http://gizmodo.com/people/melvinjunko/posts/) writes a good article explaining why batteries come to an end (full article at http://gizmodo.com/5681005/giz-explains-why-batteries-die).

Worth a read.


Waste of money

Luke Plunkett at Kotaku (http://kotaku.com/people/Plunkett/posts/) reports that “[…] MMOSite reckons the man, a guild leader, spent $15,000 for the privilege of playing on the enormous screen (located in Beijing), which bought him an evening on a deck chair playing the game on his laptop. […]” (full article at http://kotaku.com/5698036/playing-video-games-on-a-screen-bigger-than-a-football-field).

I don’t think is a matter of how much you can afford to spend for some privilege, but seems to me a real stupid thing spending money to play on a screen that is, by the way, not capable of supporting the image format that needs to be tiled three times.

I think that with same amount of money he could have played the game on some important screen and maybe use the rest for something more intelligent….

This post as a comment also at http://kotaku.com/5698036/playing-video-games-on-a-screen-bigger-than-a-football-field


Monopoly or not?

Mathew Ingram at GigaOM writes a good article starting from Tim Wu new book on if we should be scared or not of Google, Apple and Facebook and if we are going toward a de-facto monopoly.

Mathew writes “[…] that just as AT&T was a monopoly during an earlier phase of communications history, companies like Google, Facebook and Apple now have what he calls “information monopolies” that could be just as damaging to our society. But does he present a convincing case that this is true? Not really. […]”

I agree with Mathew that we are not facing a monopoly, but I think better a “specialized” oligopoly, because Apple is a market maker for Phone trends, while Facebook is a reference for Social Networking.

Google is quite different, since offers a broader number of services, but there’s always an alternative for each of them. The truth is that in most cases Google services are better than the rest.

This post as a comment also at http://gigaom.com/2010/11/25/tim-wu-google-facebook/?go_commented=1#comment-524467


iOS 4.3 coming in mid december

Chris Foresman at Ars Technica reports that “[…] iOS 4.2 took a little longer than planned to roll out; a last minute WiFi bug in the 4.2 golden master caused a delay of a few weeks to rev up to the 4.2.1 version that was released on Monday. Despite this, Apple is rumored to have iOS 4.3 already waiting in the wings for a mid-December release. That update is said to bring a new subscription billing API for in-app purchasing, according to MacStories, enabling app developers to collect recurring charges directly through iTunes for print, video, or other content. […]” (full article at http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2010/11/ios-43-rumored-for-mid-december-with-in-app-subscriptions.ars).

Same does Brian Barrett at Gizmodo (full article at http://gizmodo.com/5697563/is-ios-43-just-around-the-corner).

Ok. I agree that the market is demanding and the continuous release of new versions is a way to adapt the system to developments and market needs.

But in my opinion would be a little better to have a unique realse in december than having two separate ones at the distance of less than a month.

Is not a matter of complexity, of course, but is a matter of being pragmatic.

This post as a comment als at http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2010/11/ios-43-rumored-for-mid-december-with-in-app-subscriptions.ars?comments=1&p=21058072#comment-21058072 and at http://gizmodo.com/5697563/is-ios-43-just-around-the-corner


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