Category Archives: Tech

A guide to Facebook privacy settings

Ghacks has published here a small but useful guide to basi security settings in Facebook.

Suggestions include the fact that “[…] , this menu is entirely customizable. If you do not want anyone who is not on your friends list to access any of your information then you can do this from here. If you don’t mind if friends of friends also have access to your profile then this is an option too. For example, if I wanted everyone to be able to see when my birthday is then I would first click on the ‘Customize Settings’ tab. From here, I would enable everyone to see my birthday. It is as simple as that. Let’s take a closer look at each of the different settings that you can edit when it comes to Facebook privacy. […]

First of all is the ‘Posts by me’ section. This will include any status updates that you write, any wall posts that you make, or any photos that you upload. Obviously, the most sensible thing to do here is to set this to ‘Friends only’. This is because you do not want people that you do not know getting access to things that you have said, or your personal information or images.
The ‘Bio and Favourite Quotations’ section is up to you whether or not you would like to make this section private. However, it is important to remember that you may be putting private information about yourself in the Bio section which others will be able to see if you do allow this section to be public rather than private. The ‘Family and Relationships’ section is another one that is best kept private. The reason for this is because if you allow this information to be public then everyone can see members of your family which not everyone would be comfortable with. Of course, it is up to you, but it is best to be on the safe side. The rest of the information in this section of the privacy settings would usually be better if it were set to ‘Friends Only’, because it is all personal information. […]”

I think the guide is useful despite the fact that this brain confusing level of security that is implemented by Facebook for me is still unreliable and difficult to understand by average user.

This post as a comment also here.


Protecting yourself from radiations

Wikihow has published a good guide to teach more useful ways to protect yourself from radiations  (full article here).

In this times of nuclear fear, worth a read.


iOS 4.3.1 on the ramp

Apple is releasing iOS 4.3.1, which, as Jacqui Cheng from Ars Technica explains here, “[…]

brings with it fixes for a fourth-generation iPod touch graphics glitch as well as bugs that caused iPhones to have trouble activating and connecting to cell networks. The update also addresses flickering issues that occur when connecting a device to certain HDTVs with Apple’s Digital AV adapter and “resolves an issue authenticating with some enterprise web services.”

The release notes don’t make specific reference to fixing some of the battery issues reported around the Web or patching iPad jailbreak vulnerabilities, though rumors had suggested that iOS 4.3.1 would address both of these topics. It’s possible, however, that they (and other fixes) could fall under Apple’s umbrella of general bug fixes.  […]”.

I think that a wrong release could happen to anybody, but releasing a fix only after 2 weeks is a signal that Apple is a little bit in a hurry in their releases.

This post as a comment also here


Getting access to Google Body

Google body is to anatomy what Google earth is to geography.

To get access you need to go to browser site (here).

You will need to have a WebGl enabled browser.

This is the kind of applications that should be written: fast, detailed, open and educationals.

 


Windows live messenger features

Ryan Dube at makeuseof.com shows us some useful WLM features :

“[…] Integration with every IM […] You can import contacts from all of your top social networks and email systems like Facebook, LinkedIn, Outlook, AOL Mail and even your Gmail account. […] Once you open up a chat with one of your online contacts, at any point during the chat, you can send over a file by clicking on “Files” and “Send a file or photo…” […] How to enable WLM for mobile […] Voice clipping and other […]” (full article here)

I’m not a big fan of Windows live Messsenger, but in some way can help you working better


Google working to shrink Chrome a little bit

Stephen Shankland at Cnet reports that “[…] When Chrome got its start, the browser was svelte and fast-loading if limited. Now, it’s got plenty of features, but two years later, it’s nearly three times bigger. And Google, deciding that’s not a good thing, has set up a task force to curtail Chrome bloat.

The task force is “aggressively looking at options to bring down the size of Chrome distribution binaries,” said Anthony Laforge, Chrome technical program manager, in a mailing list message this month. Binary files are the ones computers understand; they’re created from human-comprehensible source code. […]” (full article here)

I personally hope that this optimization will give us a still performing, secure and no compromises browser  like the one we are used to.

I think is an effort worth a try, especially if you think at the times (not so far) when a program was measured in kbytes 😉  and worked fine despite using tons of space (HD or RAM).

This post as a comment also here


Aiim social roadmap white paper

Aiim (site here), for over 60 years, AIIM has been the leading non-profit organization focused on helping users to understand the challenges associated with managing documents, content, records, and business processes.

Now among other interesting articles, Aiim proposed a”[…] roadmap [that] is a tool to help organizations effectively develop social business processes and to help identify and address potential issues before they become real problems. […] The social business roadmap consists of eight primary steps. Each step is briefly described here and is addressed in substantially more detail over the course of the document. Links to the eight steps take you to our wiki, where we discuss the “what’s next”, case studies, and your additional thoughts and feedback. […]

Main steps are

 

  • Emergence. In this step the organization is not using social technologies in any formal or organized way. Instead, individuals or small groups within the organization are experimenting with social technologies to determine whether there is business value to them.
  • Strategy. Once the organization begins to develop experience with social technologies and has identified potential business value from their use, it is important to create a framework that identifies how it expects to use these technologies, and the goals and objectives for their use.
  • Development. With the strategy in place, the organization can make informed decisions about what tools to implement, how to implement them, where to implement them, and how they will potentially scale more broadly within the organization.
  • Monitoring. Initially the organization should spend time monitoring and listening to the conversations taking place in and around a particular tool to get a sense of the nature of the tool, the content of the conversations, the target audiences, and who the leading participants are. This is perhaps more visible in externally focused processes but is important for internal ones as well.
  • Participation. Once the organization has done some listening it will be able to participate more meaningfully and should begin doing so according to what it has learned about the target market and the nature of the conversations on the various tools.
  • Engagement. The goal is for participation to move to engagement – from speaking at or to customers to engaging with them. This means creating processes to respond to issues, both internally and externally, and ensuring that communications are clear, accurate, and authentic.
  • Governance. This step describes the process for developing an effective governance framework for social business processes. Some of the steps are specific to certain tools or capabilities, while others are more broadly applicable, such as an acceptable usage policy.
  • Optimization. Once social business processes are in place, they should be actively managed and reviewed to ensure that the organization is realizing the expected benefits. This includes but is not limited to monitoring the tools in real time, identifying and measuring specific metrics, and training users on new or evolving tools and processes.
  • […]” (full article here, direct download link for white paper here)

    In a complex contest like the one of “going social” I think that a rationalization effort is really important also to avoid smaller organizations getting lost into fuzzy and fancy words.

     

     


    Customizing Google results

    Tim Conneally at Beta news reports that “[…]  Google on Thursday introduced an experimental feature which continues its mission to chip away at undesirable search results and information from “content farms”: the ability to block all results from a particular URL.

    Now, when search results are returned, there is a button next to each link labeled “Block all [URLNAME] results.” When clicked, that site is sent to a block list, which can be managed in the user’s Google account.

    “We’re adding this feature because we believe giving you control over the results you find will provide an even more personalized and enjoyable experience on Google. In addition, while we’re not currently using the domains people block as a signal in ranking, we’ll look at the data and see whether it would be useful as we continue to evaluate and improve our search results in the future,” Google search quality engineers Amay Champaneria and Beverly Yang said today. […]” (full article here).

    Jacqui Cheng at Ars technica adds that “[…] The new blacklisting feature is triggered when you perform a Google search, click on a link, and then go backto Google after having decided that link isn’t what you wanted. When you return to Google the second time, a new option appears next to the Cached link that says “Block all [website name] results.” If you’re logged into your Google account (which is required in order to maintain a blacklist), you can then click that link and get a confirmation message that you want to block it.

    Google wrote on its blog that you may not see the site disappear right away if you simply refresh your browser with the same search, but running a new search should get that domain out of your face for good. “The next time you’re searching and a blocked page would have appeared, you’ll see a message telling you results have been blocked, making it easy to manage your personal list of blocked sites,” Google Search quality engineers Amay Champaneria and Beverly Yang wrote. “This message will appear at the top or bottom of the results page depending on the relevance of the blocked pages. […]” (full article here)

    I don’t believe this will give in full control to the user (come on, results mean completeness of search and more practically money), but I appreciate the effort mad by Google to allow users to customize they’re searches.

    This post as a comment also at Betanews and at Ars Technica


    Olivetti launches OliPad

    Christopher Trout at Engadget reports an original post by Riccardo saying that “[…] This week, Olivetti announced the release of the OliPad, staking its claim to a slice of the slab pie, and repositioning itself on the enterprise PC market. Heralded (at least by Olivetti) as Italy’s first tablet, the OliPad sports a 10-inch screen, 3G, WiFi, and Bluetooth connectivity, NVIDIA Tegra 2, Android 2.2.2, and a 1024 x 600 display. It also features USB and HDMI ports and a 1.3 megapixel camera, but perhaps most telling is the simultaneous launch of the Application Warehouse, “a virtual storehouse of configurable and customizable software applications designed by Olivetti specifically for business and government. […]” (full story here)

    I’m Italian and proud of this. Despite the name, well abused (like was e-everything in 90s, i-everything in this years, now the claim is for pad-evereything), I love the fact that a company like Olivetti is getting back in serious business with something that is also appealing on a visual POV.

    This post as a comment also at Engadget


    Using iTunes Home share feature

    Kelly Clay at Lockergnome (http://www.twitter.com/kellyhclay) wrote a good tutorial on how to use Apple Home Share feature. Simply “[…]

    1. Open iTunes on one computer connected to your home network.
    2. Select Home Sharing from the sidebar of iTunes.
    3. Enter your iTunes account information.
    4. Authorize this computer, if not authorized yet.
    5. Repeat steps 1-4 on each additional computer of the home network. Keep in mind you can only authorize 5 computers for each iTunes account, so you may want to set up your kids or leeching roommates with their own accounts, or create a new iTunes account

    […]” (full article at http://www.lockergnome.com/windows/2011/03/04/how-to-use-itunes-home-sharing-at-home-or-work/).

    Please remember you can authorize at most 5 computers.


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